Quaker Earthcare Witness Presents: Virtual Workshops for Your Community

Quaker Earthcare Witness staff, Steering Committee Members and Friends are offering online workshops for your Friends meeting or church on Earthcare concerns. Please see the list of presenters below and invite us to join you in a virtual meeting. To schedule one of these presentations, please email Quaker Earthcare Witness (QEW) Communications Coordinator, hayley@quakerearthcare.org 

CLIMATE, COVID-19, AND AN UPRISING
Shelley Tanenbaum, General Secretary

We are living in rapidly changing times, facing challenges of monumental proportion: a global pandemic, climate change and related ecological disasters, and institutional racism and violence. These challenges are connected and we cannot address any one of them without addressing all of them. What can we learn from our experience with Covid19, and how does that inform our response to climate change? How do privilege and institutional barriers create disproportionate impacts from both a pandemic and ecological crises? What happens when we open ourselves to kinship with nature and each other? What can we do?

A VISION FROM 2050: LOOKING BACK ON COVID-19 & CLIMATE CHANGE
Hayley Hathaway, Communications Coordinator, QEW

It's the year 2050, thirty years after we faced a global pandemic, economic collapse, and impending climate chaos. Where are we now? How did we get here?  Hayley will guide us through an exercise in radical imagination, where we sit with the possibilities of building a new society, one based in solidarity, cooperation, and interdependence. She'll also share about the exciting and motivating work that's happening right now around the US on some of the most pressing issues of our time and how to get involved through her lens as Communications Coordinator with Quaker Earthcare Witness and as an activist on local climate issues.

REGENERATIVE AGRICULTURE: SUSTAINABLE IS NOT ENOUGH
Carol Barta, QEW Steering Committee

Why is sustainable not enough in the world of agriculture? What will it take to produce nutrient dense food on healthy soil?  Regenerative agriculture is a systems approach to restoring the health of our food system.  Over the course of the last four decades a growing number of farmers and ranchers have risked, stumbled and learned how to build healthy soil and healthy profits for their farms by going against the conventional wisdom.  Along the way they discovered that healthy soil is the basis for a healthy ecosystem and potentially a healthy planet. We'll explore the component parts of regenerative agriculture and discuss why whole-system-thinking is the best way to feed the world.

IMAGINING QUAKER TESTIMONIES APPLIED TO THE CIRCLE OF LIFE
Mary Ann Percy, QEW Steering Committee

We will use Quaker contemplative practices and an exercise from The Work That Reconnects (Joanna Macy, root teacher) to deepen intimacy with all beings. We will begin to imagine a new (old) story of how to apply Quaker testimonies to the entire Circle of Life. We will begin with a brief presentation, and then we will practice worship sharing with nonhuman nature (ie outside, or with a houseplant, etc). Insights from this practice will inform worship sharing in small breakout groups. Our query will focus on how we can understand our Testimonies of Unity, Equality, Integrity, Community, Simplicity, and Peace directing us toward harmonious and reciprocal relationships which respect the inherent integrity of the Earth community. 

A RANGE OF TAILORED EARTHCARE WORKSHOPS
Beverly G. Ward, QEW Steering committee and SEYM Field Secretary for Earthcare

•Sweet Home Monteverde film screening and discussion with Robin Truesdale and Bill Adler, filmmakers, https://sweethomemonteverde.com/

•Angelic Earthcare Troublemaker training:  Beyond Bystandin

•Climate Justice in Our Community (Location specific climate justice issues)

•Permaculture is Not Just Agriculture

•Transportation, migration, and climate

•Underwater Homeowners Association

•Water:  Sea Level Rise, Flooding, and Water Quality

•Waterline Communities:  Displacement and Gentrification and Why Quakers Should Care

•Climate Justice and the Breath of Life:  Air Quality and Frontline Communities

•Introduction to Project Drawdown with Quakers

FINDING WAY FORWARD: FRIENDS CARE FOR THE EARTH
Mary Jo Klingel, QEW Steering Committee Clerk

When Quaker Earthcare Witness Friends began speaking to the Religious Society of Friends, we saw our work as alerting Friends to the impending dangers of climate change.  Today, Friends are fully aware of the tragedy of our failure to care for the Earth.  Friends are more likely to ask us, “What can I do?”  Mary Jo’s workshop will address that question directly, as we consider the many gifts that Friends have to offer. The workshops are interactive, optimistic and grounded in Friends Testimonies. We will come together in community and seek collectively to guide Friends to support one another and our Earth.  

SOUNDS OF SILENCE
Brad Stocker, QEW Steering Committee

“Do not break the silence unless you can improve upon it.”  – William Ralph Inge. We often mistakenly assume silence is the absence of sound and there is hardly ever a time that is so. It has been said that hearing is the last sense to die and so, we are encouraged to speak to those in a coma or near death. In this workshop we will explore silence in some of its varieties of uses and abuses. We will aim to become more mindful about how silence is functioning in our lives and effects our care for Earth. 

BUILDING THE HEART MUSCLE TO TAKE ON THREATS TO THE EARTH
Pamela Haines, Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting

To build our muscles as climate justice activists, we will identify stretches involving listening and connecting, engaging in conflict and repair, listening for and speaking truth, facing grief, and cultivating hope and courage. 

FINANCIAL AND ECONOMIC ROOTS OF THE CLIMATE EMERGENCY
Pamela Haines, Central Philadelphia Monthly Meeting

The dynamics and priorities of our economy are a key driver of the climate emergency, and the economy is now driven to a significant extent by the financial sector. You don’t have to be an economist to explore these connections and identify key issues and areas of opportunity.