What Can We Do about Climate Change?

Issue Date: 
March - April 2008
Volume and Number: 
Volume 8, No 2
Author: 
Charles Blanchard and Shelley Tanenbaum
PDF Version: 


QUAKER ECO-BULLETIN
Information and Action Addressing Public Policy 
for an Ecologically Sustainable World
Volume 8, Number 2  
 
 
 
 March-April 2008
What Can We Do about Climate Change?
Charles Blanchard and Shelley Tanenbaum
 Everyone grumbles about the weather, but nobody seems to do anything about it. —attributed to Mark Twain
Many Friends have heard about climate change, and some have  frequent, and the number of intense hurricanes in the North Atlantic 
begun living different lifestyles in response. Yet, many of us  has increased. Spring is arriving earlier in northern latitudes, and some 
wonder if our personal actions are of much significance compared with  bird species are out of synch; they are trying to raise their young when 
the global need, and ask, “what can Friends contribute?” 
food is not available. According to the IPCC, “approximately 20-30% 
Friends can lead by example. Friends’ historic commitments to  of species assessed so far are likely to be at increased risk of extinction 
the right sharing of world resources and to living with integrity require  if increases in global average warming exceed 1.5-2.5oC, relative to 
us to examine our personal lifestyles, and make changes accordingly;  1980-1999.” Public health officials in many areas are beginning to plan 
there is no other moral choice. Friends’ historical belief in racial and  for increased incidence of infectious diseases and heat stress. 
gender equality existed long before the abolitionist, suffrage, civil- A Multi-Solution Approach 
rights, and women’s-rights movements. Quakers were in the forefront 
of those social-change movements, serving as leaders and role models 
It is not too late to minimize the amount of future warming. CO2
for others. Friends, as a corporate body, are somewhat late in joining  accounts for nearly one-half the warming caused by anthropogenic 
the environmental movement, but we nevertheless bring an historical  emissions of soot and greenhouse gases. To hold the future global 
boldness in working for social change based on traditions of integrity,  average temperature increase to 2oC, global CO  emissions need to 
2
community, and simplicity. Bold changes are needed once again.
be controlled. 
In an influential and widely cited study, Stephen Pacala and 
Energy, Carbon, and Climate
Robert Socolow showed that we already have the technology to meet 
In 1896, Swedish chemist and Nobel Prize winner Svante Arhe- the world
the 

world s energy 

needs 
energy 
for 
needs 
the 
for 
next 
the 
50 
next  y
50  ears 
y
while 
ears 
first 
while 
halting, 
first 
then 
halting, 
nius recognized that combustion of fossil fuels, which releases carbon  reversing, historical increases in CO  emissions.2 Their key insights 
dioxide (CO ) into the atmosphere, would warm the planet, because 
2
are: 
2
CO  is a greenhouse gas—it traps heat that the earth radiates out to 
2
1) No single solution solves the CO  problem.
space2.  Fifty  years  ago,  human  activities  released  about  two  bil ion 
2
2) The  portfolio  of  commercially  available  technologies  is  large 
metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year. Today, global 
enough that not every mode of carbon reduction has to be used.
anthropogenic (human-caused) CO  emissions are approximately eight 
2
3) Different countries may choose different sets of actions, depending 
billion metric tons of carbon per year
2
. If we continue on this “busi-
upon needs, resources, and priorities.
ness as usual” path and the world does not make reduction of carbon 
4) Don’t  expect  revolutionary  technology  to  solve  the  immediate 
emissions a priority, human-generated CO  emissions may double in 
2
problems.
fifty years. Because of feedback effects and 2delayed responses, Earth 
Pacala and Socolow introduce the idea of a carbon “wedge,” any 
has only begun to respond to the CO  that we have already added to 
2
change that reduces carbon emissions by a 20 million-ton increment 
the atmosphere and oceans—it will continue 
2
to warm even without  each year for 50 years in comparison to business-as-usual practices. At 
further CO  emissions. 
2
The most recent report by the Nobel prize-winning 
Intergovernmental  Panel  on  Climate  Change  (IPCC) 
predicts that business as usual will increase global average 
temperature by about 3.4 degrees Celsius (oC), relative to 
1980–99, by the end of the 21st century, with a likely range 
of 2.0 to 5.4oC. In comparison, global average temperature 
has increased about 1oC (1.8 degrees 
degr
Fahr
F enheit)) 
ahr
since 
1850, and 0.5oC since 1980.1
For the past 2 to 3 million years, our planet has been 
cooler than typical, with permanent ice caps waxing and 
waning about every 100,000 years. We are now living in 
a warm interglacial period, so a rise in global temperature 
greater than about 2oC will result in climate conditions 
that last occurred before the genus Homo first appeared. 
The planet can cope with warmer climates. After all, for 
much of geological time, Earth was substantially warmer 
than today. But many species, including humans, may not 
be able to adapt to such rapid climate changes. 
Some of the consequences of climate change have 
already begun to appear. Many glaciers are retreating and 
summer Arctic ice cover is shrinking. Since 1993, the global 
average sea level has risen nearly twice as fast (3.1 mm per 
year) as in previous decades. Heat waves have become more  Figure 1. CO  stabilization wedges. <www.princeton.edu/wedges> Reprinted by permission.
2

the end of 50 years, each wedge accounts for one billion metric tons of carbon not added to 
Earth’s atmosphere (Figure 1, p. 1). They propose first stabilizing global carbon emissions 
Quaker  Eco-Bulletin  (QEB)  is  pub-
with available technologies and then reducing emissions by employing more advanced 
lished bi-monthly by Quaker Earthcare 
technologies that will take longer to develop. Since this study was published four years ago, 
Witness (formerly FCUN) as an insert 
the calculations have been updated to account for recent emission increases and the lack of 
in BeFriending Creation.
action between 2004 and 2007.3 According to the update, capping world CO  emissions 
2
now requires eight wedges, compared with the 2004 estimate of seven wedges. Moreover, 
The vision of Quaker Earthcare Wit-
many climate scientists now believe that it is necessary to reduce CO  emissions to avert the 
2
ness  (QEW)  includes  integrating  into 
most severe effects of climate change. Stabilizing emissions is a start, but it won’t be enough 
the beliefs and practices of the Society 
to keep temperatures from rising past the 2oC threshold. But delay is harmful. If the world 
of Friends the Truths that God’s Creation 
waits another five years to tackle emission reductions, simply capping CO  emissions at 
2
is to be held in reverence in its own right, 
2004 levels could require 10 wedges.
and that human aspirations for peace 
and justice depend upon restoring the 
The Choice is Ours: Selecting the Wedges
Pacala and Socolow identified 15 carbon wedges, each of which would prevent one 
Earth’s ecological integrity. As a mem-
billion metric tons of carbon emissions by 2054. They identified a technology as a wedge 
ber organization of Friends Committee 
only if it was commercially available now or could be ramped up in scale very soon. Ac-
on National Legislation, QEW seeks to 
complishing any one of these will require major efforts. Table 1 shows the wedges arranged 
strengthen Friends’ support for FCNL’s 
by types of energy production and consumption. 
witness in Washington DC for peace, 
justice, and an Earth restored.
Table 1. Wedges (Pacala and Socolow, 2004, 2007)
QEB’s purpose is to advance Friends’ 
witness on public and institutional poli-
Type of Energy Production
T
Type of Energy 
T
cies that affect the Earth’s capacity to 
Consumption
Energy Effi ciency and 
support life. QEB articles aim to inform 
Resource Conservation
Renewable Energy
Nonrenewable Energy
Friends about public and corporate poli-
Transportation
1) 2X* vehicle mpg $
 7) 30X ethanol $$
11) Synfuels (CCS) $$
cies that have an impact on society’s 
2) Halve VMT $
 8) H  (wind) $$$
12) H  (CCS) $$$
2
2
relationship  to  Earth,  and  to  provide 
Electricity
3) 25% better $
 9) 40X wind $$
13) Natural gas $
analysis and critique of societal trends 
4) CFPP effi ciency $
10) 700X solar $$$
14) CCS at CFPP $$
and institutions that threaten the health 
15) 3X nuclear $$
of the planet.
Biostorage
5) Protect forests $
6) Agricultural practices $
Friends are invited to contact us about 
writing an article for QEB. Submissions 
*X = expansion of current conditions by factor indicated, mpg = miles per gallon, VMT = vehicle 
are subject to editing and should: 
miles traveled, CFPP = coal-fi red power plant, H  = hydrogen, CCS = carbon capture and storage
2
• Explain why the issue is a 
Relative costs of options are reproduced from <www.princeton.edu/wedges> and are intended as 
Friends’ concern.
general approximations: $ = low cost, $$ = moderate cost, $$$ = high cost
• Provide accurate, documented 
Energy Effi ciency 
background information that re- 
Energy use, especial y in North America, is so inefficient that there are huge opportuni-
flects the complexity of the issue 
ties to reduce CO  emissions through efficiency improvements, at very modest cost. 
and is respectful toward other 
2
points of view.
Tr
T a
r n
a s
n p
s o
p r
o ta
t t
a ito
i n
. Two wedges are achievable from changes in transportation. Doubling 
• Relate the issue to legislation or 
the average vehicle fuel-use efficiency from a hypothetical business-as-usual world average 
30 mpg at mid-century to a readily-attainable 60 mpg is one wedge (Table 1, wedge 1). 
corporate policy.
Cutting the average vehicle miles traveled in half by traveling less, providing better mass-
• List what Friends can do.
transit alternatives, and changing commuting patterns, provides another wedge (wedge 2). 
• Provide references and sources 
Doubling fuel efficiency and cutting vehicle miles in half together yield 1.5 wedges (being 
for additional information.
careful to avoid double-counting). Complete elimination of the remaining carbon emis-
sions from vehicles could be achieved using carbon-neutral types of ethanol production and 
QEB Coordinator: Keith Helmuth
plug-in hybrids.  Additional carbon savings could be achieved from increased efficiency in 
QEB Editorial Team: Judy Lumb, 
rail transport and by shifting from air travel to more efficient modes of transit.
Sandra Lewis, Barbara Day
Electricity
E
. Increasing efficiency in consumption and production of electricity of-
fers opportunities for two wedges. One efficiency wedge (wedge 3) comes from reducing 
To receive QEB:
energy use in buildings (much of which involves electricity) by 25 percent. More than one 
Email: QEB@QuakerEarthcare.org
wedge is possible if energy-use improvements exceed 25 percent. This option is low-cost, 
Website: <QuakerEarthcare.org> 
and very doable. 
Mail: write to address below
A second electricity efficiency wedge (wedge 4) is available if mid-century coal-fired 
power plants produce twice as much electricity by operating at 60 percent efficiency com-
Projects of Quaker Earthcare Witness, 
pared to the present 32 percent. If electricity continues to be produced from coal-fired plants, 
such as QEB, are funded by contribu-
which appears likely as long as coal is inexpensive, doubling the energy output per unit of 
tions to: 
coal consumed will allow generating capacity to grow without increasing CO  emissions. 
2
Quaker Earthcare Witness
China and India currently account for 45 percent of world coal use, and in each of the two 
countries coal is the overwhelming energy source for electricity production, so they will 
173-B N Prospect Street
certainly continue to use coal.
Burlington VT 05401 
2
Quaker Eco-Bulletin 8:2 • March-April 2008

Resource Conservation 
at plants producing hydrogen and synfuel could provide two wedges 
Storing  carbon  in  plants  and  soils  (biostorage)  potentially  (wedges 11 and 12). Hydrogen production is one of the most expensive 
provides two wedges. One carbon wedge could be achieved by stop- strategies available, due to the costs of building a new infrastructure 
ping all deforestation by mid-century (wedge 5), compared with a  for distribution. Synfuels, while less expensive, are still costly. 
business-as-usual future in which the rate of deforestation is half that 
of today. A second biostorage option is conservation tillage. Annual  Nuclear Power 
plowing accelerates carbon emissions from soils, whereas dril ing seeds 
Nuclear fission reactors produce electricity with very low emis-
into soil without plowing, using cover crops, and practicing erosion  sions of CO . Estimates of nuclear fission capacity vary from one wedge 
2
control all prevent carbon losses from soils. Such practices, known as  obtained by tripling today’s global nuclear energy capacity (wedge 15) 
conservation tillage, now occur on about one-sixteenth of the world’s  to two or more wedges if even more nuclear reactors are built. 
croplands. They could produce one wedge if extended to all agricul-
While some see increased nuclear energy capacity as essential to 
tural soils (wedge 6).
reducing CO  emissions, the problems associated with nuclear energy 
2
today are no di2fferent than they were 30 years ago. The technologies for 
 Renewable Energy
enriching uranium and operating fission reactors are well developed, 
Transpor
T
tation. A 30-fold increase in ethanol production is one  but no permanent waste repositories exist. Tripling nuclear fission 
wedge (wedge 7). Hydrogen-fueled vehicles could be one wedge, either  reactors wil  triple waste disposal needs and generate thousands of tons 
wedge 8 or wedge 12, depending on what fuel is used to generate the  of plutonium. Reprocessing involves additional difficulties and the 
hydrogen. But there is no gain in displacing petroleum twice. To be a  potential for proliferation of nuclear weapons is a major disadvantage 
carbon savings, either ethanol or hydrogen must be produced without  of expanding nuclear energy. 
using fossil fuels substantially in their production. Ethanol from crops 
is likely to be cheaper than hydrogen, because a hydrogen fuel system  The Path Forward
requires a new infrastructure. But, ethanol should be produced from 
A pathway for stabilizing carbon emissions exists. Energy ef-
non-food crops.
ficiency, resource conservation, and renewable energy sources could 
Electricity
E
. Wind energy provides one wedge, if it expands to 30  provide two wedges from transportation, four wedges from electricity 
times today’s capacity (wedge 9). The cost of wind-generated electric- production and consumption, and two from other sectors. A solar 
ity is comparable to other low-cost sources of electricity today. Wind  electricity wedge is attainable with PVs, concentrating solar power, 
energy is expanding at the rate of about 30 percent per year. Depending  or a combination of the two. Another solar wedge is possible from 
on how long this rate can be sustained, wind yields at least one and  increased efforts to incorporate passive solar heating and water heat-
possibly two or more wedges. 
ing into building designs. For fossil-fuel strategies, one wedge can be 
Solar electricity, from photovoltaic (PV) systems, is not cost- obtained by doubling conversion efficiencies at coal-fired power plants, 
competitive at present, but is still expanding as fast as wind energy,  but that same wedge, or more, could also be developed through various 
about 30 percent per year. If sustained, PV creates one or more wedges  combinations of efficiency, substitution of natural gas for coal, and 
(wedge 10). A second approach for generating electricity from the sun,  implementation of carbon-capture-and-storage. An eighth wedge is 
concentrating solar power, has been tested at development and pre- possible from biostorage as a combination of changes in forestry and 
commercial facilities for over twenty years; if costs were halved, it would  agriculture. Together, the categories potential y provide al  eight wedges 
be commercially competitive. Another full wedge may be achieved by  needed to stabilize global CO  emissions by mid-century.
2
passive solar design of buildings, insulation, solar water heating, and 
CO  emissions stabilization could be accomplished without rely-
2
heat pumps, all of which are commercially available now
ing on current-generation nuclear technologies. With further research, 
Other renewable sources of electricity may develop before mid- more advanced nuclear fuel cycles may become commercially viable 
century. Examples include the production of electricity from waves and  in the future. Such advanced fuel cycles would be attractive if they 
tides, neither of which is yet at the stage of commercial production. 
generate negligible waste and are resistant to weapons proliferation. 
At present, the available nuclear technologies have serious deficien-
Fossil-Fuel Strategies
cies and are very expensive when full life-cycle costs are considered. 
Natural Gas. One wedge could be provided by replacing 1400  Current international agreements and cooperation to monitor nuclear 
coal-fired plants with natural gas, which would result in four times  technologies and materials are inadequate. The InterAcademy Council 
the current capacity of natural-gas fired power plants (wedge 13).  concluded that nuclear power could contribute only if major concerns 
The carbon savings results because natural gas yields twice as much  related to capital cost, safety, and weapons proliferation are addressed.4
energy per ton of carbon emitted as coal does. Substituting natural  In our view, rapid expansion of nuclear power is a strategy best left 
gas for coal is inexpensive, but supplies of natural gas may be limited  for the future. 
and can be difficult to deliver to markets. The infrastructure needed 
Control of CO  emissions should be supplemented by more 
to expand natural gas production and delivery includes large numbers 
2
vigorous efforts to control anthropogenic emissions of other air pol-
of new pipelines and terminals for loading and unloading liquefied  lutants that contribute to global warming. For example, eliminating 
natural gas. 
diesel exhaust would improve public health and reduce soot, which 
Carbon 
C
capture 
captur and storage. The technologies for carbon cap- contributes to warming by nearly 20 percent as much as CO . Efforts 
2
ture and storage are used commercially today, but not for reducing  to reduce concentrations of other air pollutants, including methane, 
CO  emissions. The petroleum industry injects CO  into oil fields to  ozone, and halocarbons, will also mitigate global warming.
2
2
enhance petroleum yields. One wedge could be achieved by installing 
The path forward relies on energy efficiency, renewable energy, 
carbon capture and storage at approximately 80 percent of the existing  improved management of forests and farmland, and reductions of air 
coal-fired power plants today (wedge 13), requiring 100 times as much  pollutants, in addition to CO . This pathway does not require a rapid 
geological storage of CO  as the petroleum industry now practices. 
2
expansion of nuclear energy, or wide-scale development of hydrogen 
2
The U.S. could demonstrate leadership by requiring all new coal-fired  or synfuels. 
power plants to employ carbon capture and storage. 
Our 
O proposed 
pr
path is not radically different 
differ
from 
fr
analyses car-
Tr
T a
r n
a s
n p
s o
p r
o t
r a
t t
a ito
i n
. Hydrogen and synthetic fuel produced from coal,  ried out by the International Energy Agency (IEA).5 According to 
called “synfuel,” are two fuels used as substitutes for petroleum in the  the IEA, energy-related CO  emissions will rise from seven billion 
operation of motor vehicles. Employing carbon capture and storage 
2
tons of carbon in 2005 to eleven billion tons carbon in 2030 under 
Quaker Eco-Bulletin 8:2 • March-April 2008
3

the  business-as-usual  reference  scenario  but  could  be  held  to  nine  What Friends Can Do
billion tons if governments implement various control measures. The 
Religious  communities  can  help  frame  the  ongoing  political 
IEA indicates that 80 percent of the avoided CO  emissions could be 
2
discussion about climate change in moral, not just technocratic or 
achieved through energy efficiency, with renewable energy sources and  economic, terms. As Quakers, we can work to build a world system 
nuclear energy each accounting for about half the remaining emission  that will make later decisions easier and establish personal habits of 
savings. Nuclear energy accounts for 10 percent of the avoided CO2 living creatively and simply. We can do our share. The future will be 
emissions through a 40 percent expansion of world capacity. A more 2 shaped by our choices. 
challenging IEA scenario further cuts 2030 CO  emissions to six bil-
2
Every global-scale action begins somewhere. Americans can make 
lion tons carbon through widespread deployment of carbon capture  an especially significant contribution in travel. From 1980 to 2006, 
and storage. 
the U.S. population increased by 32 percent, but vehicle miles traveled 
within the United States increased by 101 percent.10 Further, Americans 
Stabilizing Carbon Emissions Is Not Enough
made eight million trips overseas in 1982, compared with 27 million 
Eight wedges is a good start, but more than eight will probably  overseas trips in 2004, an increase of 240 percent.11 We can travel less 
be needed before mid-century. According to the latest IPCC assess- often and stil  experience lifestyles no worse than those that we enjoyed 
ment, holding the future temperature increase to 2oC 2050 will likely  twenty years ago, and we can travel more efficiently.12
require CO  emissions that are 50 to 85 percent below 2000 levels. 
2
These emission reductions would limit the temperature increase to 
But, try suggesting traveling less or taking public transportation 
1.5 to 1.9oC relative to 1980-99 and result in an ultimate sea-level  to someone you know—you may get an interesting response. It is dif-
increase of 0.4 to 1.4 meters.
ficult to live differently. Yet, now that we understand how damaging 
CO emissions are to the planet, and how much we in the U.S. affect 

Whether  eight  wedges  or  more,  the  developed  world  must  climate change, how can we not make changes in our lifestyles? As 
reduce its emissions over the next 50 years. Stabilizing global emis- Friends, we expect that we will “walk our talk.” We can:
sions requires that developed countries reduce their emissions, while 
developing economies grow toward equality. Developed and develop-
• Support policies promoting CO  control through energy efficiency, 
2
ing countries each account for roughly half of global CO  emissions. 
renewable energy sources, improved forestry and agricultural prac-
2
Developed countries, with industrial, carbon-based economies and 
tices, and innovation; 
high-consumption lifestyles, cannot tell developing countries not to 
• Travel fewer miles, more efficiently;
grow. At the same time, developed countries cannot eliminate their 
• Practice resource conservation in your home and place of work;
CO  emissions completely. Capping global CO  emissions at current 
2
2
• Increase the efficiency of appliances, heating, cooling, and lighting 
levels means that developed economies must reduce emissions equiva-
your home;
lent to increases occurring in developing countries—and both need to 
• Let people know what you are doing, and why;
decouple economic growth from CO emissions.

• Support  research  into  new  technologies  and adopt  them when 
Eventually, CO  emissions must be reduced to an equilibrium 
2
they become feasible; 
level that could be safely absorbed by the world’s forests and oceans. 
• Support creation of nonviolent international decision making that 
Forests in North America have been regrowing since the mid-1800s 
fairly shares power, burdens, and opportunities;
and currently 
curr
absorb about 30 percent 
per
of the Nor
N th American fossil-
• Work for global nuclear disarmament and a strong, global y trusted 
fuel emissions of CO ,6 but the future capabilities of North American 
2
control system for nuclear materials and processes.
forests to continue absorbing CO
2
 are largely unknown. 
2
Shel ey Tanenbaum and Charles Blanchard are members of Strawberry Creek 
Confronting Unlimited Growth
Monthly Meeting. They have been air quality research consultants for the 
Total carbon emissions (E) are a product of four contributing  past twenty years. Th
T e
h y
e  
y are very grateful for careful reading and suggestions 
factors: the total population (P), the consumption per person (C),  provided by R. Findley, D. Groom, S. Hawthorne, S. Lewis, J. McCarthy, J. 
energy requir
r
ed 
equir per unit of consumption (J), and carbon emissions  Russell, K. Street, E. Dreby, B. McGahey, and A. Thompson. However, the 
per unit of energy (R).7
conclusions expressed here are those of the authors.
E = P x C x J x R
References
Each of these factors contributes to total emissions. The wedges  1  <www.ipcc.ch> Scenario A2.
considered so far reduce CO  emissions through energy efficiency (J)  2
2
  Pacala, S. and R. Socolow. 2004. Stabilization wedges: solving the 
or carbon intensity (R), the last two factors in the equation. If all four 
climate problem for the next 50 years with current technologies. Science
factors are reduced, the overall reduction is greater.
305: 968-972. Supporting material <www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/
full/305/5686/968/>. See also: Robert H. Socolow and Stephen W. Pacala. A 
Population
P
. As observed by Pacala and Socolow, one additional 
plan to keep carbon in check. Scientifi c American, September 2006: 50 – 57. 
wedge 
w
is 
edge  possible 
is 
if 
possible  world 
if 
population 
world 
stabiliz
population 
es 
stabiliz at 
es  eight 
at 
billion 
eight 
instead 
billion 
<www.sciam.com>.
3
of nine billion.8 Incr
I easing 
ncr
population, while not the only cause of    <www.princeton.edu/wedges>
4  InterAcademy Council. 2007. Lighting the Way: Toward a Sustainable Energy 
climate change, makes solutions more difficult.9
Future. <www.interacademycouncil.net>
Co
C n
o s
n u
s m
u p
m t
p ito
i n
o  
n pe
p r
e  rpe
p rson. Carbon reductions are possible through  5  International Energy Agency. 2007. World Energy Outlook 2007 and World 
lifestyle changes. For the developed world, opting for lifestyles with 
Energy Outlook 2006. OECD, Paris. <www.worldenergyoutlook.org>.
6
lower rates of consumption is an option. Indeed, consumerism raises    The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR) – The North American 
Carbon Budget and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle. <www.
profound ethical and moral questions. 
climatescience.gov>
7
Energ
E
y requir
r
ed 
equir per unit of consumption. Improved energy ef-
  Ehrlich, P. R., A. H. Ehrlich, and J. P. Holdren. Ecoscience. W. H. Freeman 
ficiency is likely to go beyond what we have described. For example, 
and Company, San Francisco, 1977. 1051 pp. (p. 720).
8
green  design  has  been  embraced  by  architects  with  extraordinary    <esa.un.org/unpp/>
9  Holdren, J. 2008. Science and Technology for Sustainable Well-being.  
enthusiasm. 
(Presidential Address) Science 319: 424-434.
Em
E i
m sissiso
i n
o s
n  spe
p r
e  run
u i
n ti tof
o  fen
e e
n r
e g
r y. Innovation wil  create new technol- 10 <www.epa.gov/oar/airtrends>
11
ogy choices sooner rather than later. The options considered by Pacala 
 2004 data from <www.census.gov/compendia/statab/arts_entertainment_
and Socolow intentionally included only commercially available tech-
recreation/travel_and_tourism>. 1982 data from Statistical Abstract of the 
U.S. 1984, U. S. Dept. of Commerce, Bureau of Census.
nologies, but the need for CO  reductions is likely to stimulate innova-
2
12 Lumb, J. 2008. Riding the Rails to an Energy-Effi cient Transportation 
tive carbon-free energy solutions much sooner than mid-century. There 
Future. Quaker Eco-Bulletin 8:1. <http://quakerearthcare.org/Publications/
is no need to wait until 2050 to begin using new technologies!
QuakerEco-bulletin/CurrentIssueofQEB/QEB8-1/QEB01.htm>

Search Quaker Eco-bulletins